Meet some of the Citizens for the Wyoming Range

 

 We are not about stopping energy development in Wyoming. But we are extremely concerned about pace of development, which seems out of control, and there are some places which should be sacred in our state. We will take our fair share of the energy burden, but not all of it - that only seems fair.  

J.J. Healy, Daniel rancher

 

 

 It is difficult for me to even fathom well over 200 heavy trucks a day navigating up theMerna/North Horse Creek Road - through stands of timber and meadows rich with wildlife - in order to develop an area whose photo could take 1st place in any mountain scenery contest, bar none. It is my hope that PXP will see their resources for development better used elsewhere, where much less is at stake. 

Julie Huntley, Daniel educator

 

 


If the things that would bring tourists to our area are destroyed by massive amounts of drilling, indiscriminant drilling, then the tourists won't come back. 

Mindi Crabb, Executive Director, Green River Land Trust

 

People don't pay money to look at landscapes covered with well pads devoid of wildlife and air that has a brown tint to it.  

Dan Smitherman, Former Bondurant outfitter

 

 

 The mountains of the Wyoming Range are like no place else in the Rockies. They are very diverseand home to many different species of animals, and they shouldn't be sacrificed. Wyoming is doing its part for the nation's energy needs, but Wyoming also needs to look out for future generations and its outdoor lifestyle.  
Mike Burd, V.P., United Steelworkers Local 13214


 

 

 The exceedingly high cost of exploration and development in the Wyoming Range can't be justified in light of the important contribution that the Wyoming Range makes to the economics of the region's recreation and tourism industry.  

Jennifer Lamb, The Nature Conservancy

 Wyoming and the nation need to continue to develop our energy resources, but at the same time it is equally important to protect and preserve the attributes that bring more than 7 million money-spending visitors to Wyoming annually. There are some places which should be spared from development, and we join the growing number of individuals and organizations who believe that the Wyoming Range should be one such area.  

Gene Bryan, Chair, Wyoming Tourism Board